Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Who's Online Now
96 registered members (bobrunyan, anamnesis, anotherscott, 36251, brendon, 30 invisible), 1,416 guests, and 5 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 3 of 3 1 2 3
Re: How to write a piano sonata? [Re: dlee1001] #1631271
03/02/11 09:39 AM
03/02/11 09:39 AM
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 13,837
Iowa City, IA
Kreisler Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Kreisler  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 13,837
Iowa City, IA
There's always a place for modern reinventions of older styles. Dixieland bands doing original tunes exist. Bolcom's and Albright's revivals of Ragtime are brilliant. Arcadi Volodos, Stephen Hough, and Marc-Andre Hamelin write transcriptions and paraphrases that don't feel anachronistic at all. Even Radiohead's new album doesn't feel that much newer than what people like Kraftwerk, Pink Floyd, Kitaro, Jean-Michel Jarre, and Laurie Anderson were doing in the 70's and 80's.

Bach was old-fashioned in his day, as were Brahms and Rachmaninoff. Nothing wrong with that, they wrote what they felt.

Also, it's worth keeping in mind that sonata form is merely a dramatic archetype. Just as the love story will never go out of style, sonata form is probably here to stay for awhile. That being said, popular love stories today tend towards the "Twilight" variety and not the "Pride and Prejudice" variety. But even then, there are people for whom Pride and Prejudice is still relevant, and those who would read and enjoy something newly written in that old style.


"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)

www.pianoped.com
www.youtube.com/user/UIPianoPed
Piano & Music Gifts & Accessories (570)
Piano accessories and music gift items
Re: How to write a piano sonata? [Re: dlee1001] #1929036
07/19/12 11:59 AM
07/19/12 11:59 AM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2
Los Angeles, California
M
MUhlenkott Offline
Junior Member
MUhlenkott  Offline
Junior Member
M

Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2
Los Angeles, California
Hello. I'm coming late to this discussion and wonder if you are still interested in writing a piano sonata?

I have been working with my professor for over a year on keyboard sonata movements. We are writing in the "Galant" style (the period directly preceding & leading to the Classicism of Mozart and his generation).
Galant forms are somewhat more simplified and easier to tackle than later styles, but the simple courtly exteriors conceal very characteristic and often complicated gestures, schemes & progressions.

Writing sonatas is challenging, instructive & fun. It will help you as a student of composition in any genre. We can chat about it more if you like.

By the way, Dr. Gjerdingen at Northwestern Univ has a wonderful site which explores composition & teaching methods of the late Baroque & Classical. Check out
http://faculty-web.at.northwestern.edu/music/gjerdingen/index.htm

Re: How to write a piano sonata? [Re: MUhlenkott] #1929055
07/19/12 12:52 PM
07/19/12 12:52 PM
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 109
D
dlee1001 Offline OP
Full Member
dlee1001  Offline OP
Full Member
D

Joined: May 2010
Posts: 109
Originally Posted by MUhlenkott
Hello. I'm coming late to this discussion and wonder if you are still interested in writing a piano sonata?

I have been working with my professor for over a year on keyboard sonata movements. We are writing in the "Galant" style (the period directly preceding & leading to the Classicism of Mozart and his generation).
Galant forms are somewhat more simplified and easier to tackle than later styles, but the simple courtly exteriors conceal very characteristic and often complicated gestures, schemes & progressions.

Writing sonatas is challenging, instructive & fun. It will help you as a student of composition in any genre. We can chat about it more if you like.

By the way, Dr. Gjerdingen at Northwestern Univ has a wonderful site which explores composition & teaching methods of the late Baroque & Classical. Check out
http://faculty-web.at.northwestern.edu/music/gjerdingen/index.htm


I have finished my freshman year of college. I'm a music education major and my primary instrument is piano. In my theory class, we did learn about the sonata form and even did an analysis project on the first movement of Mozart's K545. Basically what we had to do in that project was label the exposition, development, and recapitulation. The rest consisted of marking the phrases, motives, and sequences, along with the complete Roman numeral analysis.

In my piano lessons, I've been assigned the third movement of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata, and also the first movement of Mozart's K333.

Where does all this lead to? Well, you can safely infer that I know much more about sonata form now than a year ago. Of course, there's still a lot to learn, and I have yet to apply what I have learned so far into recreating my sonata.

I have, however, applied some other things that I learned in my theory class, such as the cadential 6/4, phrases, and motives. Right now I'm contemplating what to write in order to apply my knowledge of secondary-function (secondary dominant) chords. You can see my other compositions on my MuseScore page here.

I once informed my piano teacher that I wrote a sonata and, upon me telling her that I used the first movement of Beethoven's "Patétique" sonata as a template for the first movement of my sonata (link: http://musescore.com/user/2127/scores/26530), it was revealed that I needed to add more to the composition and rewrite some parts of it. I'll have to find time to work on it.

Last edited by dlee1001; 07/19/12 12:55 PM.

Words from a lifelong friend: "Always stay true to yourself and don't let anyone take away your happiness."
Re: How to write a piano sonata? [Re: MUhlenkott] #1929490
07/20/12 06:01 AM
07/20/12 06:01 AM
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 9,063
W
wr Offline
9000 Post Club Member
wr  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
W

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 9,063
Originally Posted by MUhlenkott


By the way, Dr. Gjerdingen at Northwestern Univ has a wonderful site which explores composition & teaching methods of the late Baroque & Classical. Check out
http://faculty-web.at.northwestern.edu/music/gjerdingen/index.htm


That does look interesting! Thanks for the tip.


Re: How to write a piano sonata? [Re: wr] #1929509
07/20/12 07:48 AM
07/20/12 07:48 AM
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 6,657
D
Damon Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Damon  Offline
6000 Post Club Member
D

Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 6,657
Originally Posted by wr
Originally Posted by MUhlenkott


By the way, Dr. Gjerdingen at Northwestern Univ has a wonderful site which explores composition & teaching methods of the late Baroque & Classical. Check out
http://faculty-web.at.northwestern.edu/music/gjerdingen/index.htm


That does look interesting! Thanks for the tip.



I guess, for once, you are happy to see a "zombie thread" resurrected?

Re: How to write a piano sonata? [Re: Damon] #1929527
07/20/12 08:24 AM
07/20/12 08:24 AM
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 9,063
W
wr Offline
9000 Post Club Member
wr  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
W

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 9,063
Originally Posted by Damon
Originally Posted by wr
Originally Posted by MUhlenkott


By the way, Dr. Gjerdingen at Northwestern Univ has a wonderful site which explores composition & teaching methods of the late Baroque & Classical. Check out
http://faculty-web.at.northwestern.edu/music/gjerdingen/index.htm


That does look interesting! Thanks for the tip.



I guess, for once, you are happy to see a "zombie thread" resurrected?


"A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds..."

And I didn't characterize it as a zombie thread, anyway - that's your characterization, not mine.








Last edited by wr; 07/20/12 09:29 AM.
Re: How to write a piano sonata? [Re: wr] #1929772
07/20/12 03:24 PM
07/20/12 03:24 PM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2
Los Angeles, California
M
MUhlenkott Offline
Junior Member
MUhlenkott  Offline
Junior Member
M

Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2
Los Angeles, California
I thought I'd bring the topic back because it is an interesting and helpful one which got sidetracked a while ago by a discussion of relevancy.

Besides loving this music, writing in this style and trying to do it as perfectly as possible, it has been an incredibly helpful process for me. Learning how to construct logical, forward-driven and listenable (I hope) pieces of music would come in handy for any composer!

Anyway, there are lots of details and complexities to sonata writing. Expo, Dev & Recap are very general - really just the tip of the iceberg!

If it would be helpful to anyone, I've posted several of my Galant-style keyboard sonata movements (and a few other student pieces) at Soundcloud here:
http://soundcloud.com/search?q[fulltext]=michael+uhlenkott

Pretty basic stuff but writing these fairly simple pieces has helped me a lot!

Page 3 of 3 1 2 3

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Shop Our Online Store!
Shop Our Store Online
Shop PianoSupplies.com

Did you know Piano World has an online store, and that it's loaded with goodies pianists and music lovers want?
Check it out and place your order.

Special Purchase!
Keyboard and Roses Piano Bench Cushion Keyboard & Roses 14"x30" piano bench cushions Regularly sold for $79 to $100, now only $39. (while supplies last)

(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Why China is gripped by piano mania
by Tyrone Slothrop. 05/24/19 09:19 PM
Theory and practice
by Marpe. 05/24/19 08:39 PM
Is it possible to rebuild Steinway sound
by Coda9. 05/24/19 08:11 PM
Sulinda sl20 digital piano
by Medhead. 05/24/19 05:30 PM
Charles Walter question
by Chicago-BK. 05/24/19 05:13 PM
What's Hot!!
PIANO TEACHERS Please read this!
-------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics192,143
Posts2,831,220
Members93,416
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

Sweetwater

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.2