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Originally Posted by Dave Horne

Note by note, measure by measure - one hand at a time if need be.


as it is with eating an elephant? slowly piece by piece? smile
still lot of time is needed and life is short frown

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Originally Posted by motif
Originally Posted by Dave Horne

Note by note, measure by measure - one hand at a time if need be.


as it is with eating an elephant? slowly piece by piece? smile
still lot of time is needed and life is short frown


If we took the approach of having the teacher play a few measures and then having the student play those same measures, we would be doubling the number of man hours to get the job done, right?

Doesn't it seem more efficient to spend your time slowly working through a piece measure by measure? Before you know it your sight reading ability or just reading through ability will get better.


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Originally Posted by gsmonks
A good many concert pianists have a very small repertoire of pieces which they know note-for-note.


If you mean that some concert pianists work up a small number of programmes and then tour with them, you are correct.

However, behind that there will be a whole universe of pieces that they know intimately and could play at the drop of a hat but which they don't consider to be performance ready at that particular time.

Last edited by John_B; 11/21/10 01:30 PM.
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Well, I for one am legally blind and losing my remaining sight fast. (started around last year... D:)
I hardly ever read music cause i'm just too slow at it. And i've been learning things by ear since i could even play the piano.
Learning things by ear is faster and easier for me, but sometimes its hard picking out the notes in one hand when the other hand is overpowering...
And i often play piano with all the lights off, not even looking at the keys. It's easier then most think, but maybe thats because i'm used to it hahaha...

Last edited by Mana; 12/01/10 09:28 AM.

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Originally Posted by Mana
And i often play piano with all the lights off, not even looking at the keys. It's easier then most think, but maybe thats because i'm used to it hahaha...


I play piano also with lights off quite often or with the eyes closed. I learned it's the best method for ear traing, besides it is sound music is all abaut.

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Originally Posted by delirious


I play piano also with lights off quite often or with the eyes closed. I learned it's the best method for ear traing, besides it is sound music is all abaut.

(I hope i got the quote code right, lol i had to type it manually cause the screen reader was being gay and not letting me press the button. :p)
Yeah cause you're not distracted by your hands or there form. It's more relaxing too, probably gets you in the music more.
I have to admit, when i used to go to lessons my teacher would always be like "why the heck can't you read score?"
and i'm like um... Cause i can't? xD And she would constantly forget that i meant what i said D: ...

Last edited by Mana; 12/01/10 09:42 AM.

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Learn how to read! It is not difficult. If you can count, and memorize the position of the notes (for example second line = G, you should be able to do it.

Not being able to read means you are not normal. If you are intellectually challanged, it is OK to not be able to read. But if this is due to laziness is not acceptable. It takes forever to rely on somebody else to read for you and give you example etc.

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No this is impossible in classical music you can do this in jazz but in classical music you have to read sheet music no matter what you can learn it dont scare from the notes. Sight reading takes long time but learning notes doesnt.

Last edited by Batuhan; 12/01/10 03:58 PM.

Sorry for my English, I know it sucks, but I'm trying to improve.

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Originally Posted by RonaldSteinway

Not being able to read means you are not normal.


who said normal is good or better?

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is it possible for an actor to do his job without being able to read? is it possible for a painter to do his job without eyesight? some would say yes, I wouldn't.


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I knew a pianist who had been taught in a suzuki piano class, and her ability to play what she heard was simply amazing. There may be shortfalls to this, but I think what you asked can be done.

Tomasino




"Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do so with all thy might." Ecclesiastes 9:10

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I did read that Art Tatum used to play music by ear. The same with Cziffra who, according to his biography, had no sheet music as a child and would play by ear the themes his mother would sing to him (or something like that).


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Originally Posted by delirious
Originally Posted by RonaldSteinway

Not being able to read means you are not normal.


who said normal is good or better?


In this situation normal means a person is able to read. Therefore, it is better than people who are not able to read. Because if one can read, one can do MUCH more things than those who cannot read. Are you saying being able to do less is better than less. Again, in the normal world, being able to do more is better. I do not know from what kind of world you are from.

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My last piano teacher taught a blind, autistic child to play quite well. If you have a teacher who is experienced at this, I think you can play some classical music. Why not?

Is there a way to read notes with Braille? How about trying a Suzuki teacher?

If I were to teach you( not teaching at the moment), I would think about starting( after basics) with Denes Agay's beginning collections, especially Bach to start. I would teach you to sense the shape of your hands when different passages are played. TO know when and where to place your hand while moving to a new position. I would play a section, then have you repeat what I played. etc. etc. etc. Sound, sound, and location, touch.

When I have memorized a piece I will often practice with my eyes closed. I like the feeling - I feel even more connected with the music. Let us know how it goes.


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Is there a way to read notes with Braille?

Yeah there is actually, but since not a lot of blind people read braille anymore...
I havent even read braille since kinder when i was trying to learn it... xD i have to re-learn it now but i don't want to


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Originally Posted by RonaldSteinway
Originally Posted by delirious
Originally Posted by RonaldSteinway

Not being able to read means you are not normal.


who said normal is good or better?


In this situation normal means a person is able to read. Therefore, it is better than people who are not able to read. Because if one can read, one can do MUCH more things than those who cannot read.


wrong, actually ability to read music especially in the beginning of playing can do more harm then good. If one can read, one CANNOT do much more. One can just read more scores, that's it. Ability to play by ear, to pick up all voices and harmony just by listening that is MUCH more and more valuable then just reading scores.

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Originally Posted by delirious
wrong, actually ability to read music especially in the beginning of playing can do more harm then good. If one can read, one CANNOT do much more. One can just read more scores, that's it. Ability to play by ear, to pick up all voices and harmony just by listening that is MUCH more and more valuable then just reading scores.
Who says it has to be one or the other? Musicians ideally should be able to read and play by ear. But having to listen over and over to a complex classical piece instead of simply reading the music seems to be the longer way round.

btw, starting your posts with statements such as "wrong", or "not true" (another thread) seems like you want to stifle the discussion rather than add to it.


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