2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Who's Online Now
46 members (anotherscott, Colin Miles, Beowulf, andredatele, ando, Anglagard44, Burkey, 14 invisible), 487 guests, and 497 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Developing a sense of timing.
#1474773 07/15/10 09:53 AM
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 10
P
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
P
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 10
I have been learning piano for about 4 months now. It has been difficult to develop good/correct timing. Well, is there something like minimum time required for developing a good sense of timing?

Please advise on developing this sense.

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1474779 07/15/10 10:00 AM
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 27
S
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
S
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 27
pb:

I don't think there is a minimum required time, as one can only learn at his/her own rate. Of course, amount of time spent practicing is a factor as well.

Are you using a metronome? This is very helpful in learning correct timing, and there are several models that are very inexpensive and perfectly adequate.

Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1474780 07/15/10 10:00 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 7,083

Gold Supporter until March 1 2014
7000 Post Club Member
Offline

Gold Supporter until March 1 2014
7000 Post Club Member
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 7,083
I have no idea how long it takes, but you could try using a metronome to help you.


[Linked Image]
18 ABF Recitals, Order of the Red Dot
European Piano Parties - Brussels, Lisbon, Lucern, Milan, Malaga, St. Goar
Themed recitals: Grieg and Great American Songbook


Re: Developing a sense of timing.
casinitaly #1474792 07/15/10 10:11 AM
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 10
P
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
P
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 10
Thank you.

I have been having the same idea that metronome is useful and I SHALL practice using it in the days to come. Though I must not overdo it. Hope to share information in the future.

Thanks again.

Re: Developing a sense of timing.
casinitaly #1474797 07/15/10 10:19 AM
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,214
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,214
Use a metronome as you play, learn to count out loud as you play, clap your hands to the beat as you listen to music.

It takes a while. Good luck.


Piano teacher.
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
rocket88 #1474800 07/15/10 10:22 AM
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 10
P
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
P
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 10
Rocket88
thanks for the advice. Hope to get into the beat!!

Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1474857 07/15/10 12:34 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 306
B
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
B
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 306
As others stated, a Metronome is very good advice.

Also, depending on what you are trying to play and whether you can play it up to speed, you might try playing along to a real recording of the piece by a good performer. Although not always easy for some classical pieces, I always enjoy doing that for less intense pieces.

Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1474860 07/15/10 12:36 PM
Joined: Jan 2010
Posts: 769
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Jan 2010
Posts: 769
I have a wonderful book called "Basic Timing for the Pianist" "105 short, short exercises leading to thorough and complete mastery of basic timing problems." The author is Allan Small and it is available on Amazon.com.
You play the exercises with a metronome. It works wonders!!! I really have improved my timing as a result of using it.


Christine










[Linked Image]
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
GlassLove #1474916 07/15/10 01:51 PM
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,214
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,214
One thing I forgot to mention is drum lessons. They are probably the very best way to learn rhythm, timing and tempo.

Don't forget that the piano and drums are both categorized as percussion instruments, i.e. the hammer strikes a string with the piano. That helps me conceptualize the rhythm while playing. But YMMV.


Piano teacher.
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
rocket88 #1474922 07/15/10 02:07 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,935
I
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,935
When attempting to play jazz/blues and other improvisations, my struggle is in making changes in time. Keeping the beat is not really the issue. But I get absorbed in the sound, not the changes. A very difficult, bad habit to break. A metronome keeps me to keep the beat, but the changes in time...ugh - help, help! No more music postings for me until I get that handled.



Glen


[Linked Image]
A Bit of YouTube
PTG Associate Member
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1474947 07/15/10 02:36 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,280
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,280
Originally Posted by pb_core i7
I have been learning piano for about 4 months now. It has been difficult to develop good/correct timing. Well, is there something like minimum time required for developing a good sense of timing?

Please advise on developing this sense.
Can you elaborate on what you mean by "sense of timing"? Do you mean you have difficulty keeping a steady beat? Do you not know what the timing is supposed to sound like? Do you know what it should be, but you just can't make your fingers do it?


Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
[Linked Image] [Linked Image] [Linked Image] XVI-XXXVI
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
MaryBee #1474952 07/15/10 02:49 PM
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 374
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 374
The music school where I take flute lessons had a course on rythm and timing that was really excellent. We met every third week and did different exercises. It is not so easy to develop a sense of rythm on your own, since you need to have something that makes you notice when you are off the beat or that helps you know what the rythm should sound like.

The most basic tool is of course the metronome. Very helpful when you are playing by yourself. It always keeps a steady beat so you simply have to learn how to adjust. More fun ways can be to playalong to cd:s, or to find a duet partner for regular practise. In general any opportunity to play with others forces you to pay attention to the timing. Listening a lot to recordings of the piece you are playing is also a good help, since you really need to remember what the correct way to play the rythm should sound like.


Nothing is accomplished without enthusiasm. - Ralph Waldo Emerson

[Linked Image]

Re: Developing a sense of timing.
Basia C. #1475024 07/15/10 04:27 PM
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 3,336
T
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
T
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 3,336
Originally Posted by Basia C.

The most basic tool is of course the metronome. Very helpful when you are playing by yourself. It always keeps a steady beat so you simply have to learn how to adjust. More fun ways can be to playalong to cd:s, or to find a duet partner for regular practise. In general any opportunity to play with others forces you to pay attention to the timing. Listening a lot to recordings of the piece you are playing is also a good help, since you really need to remember what the correct way to play the rythm should sound like.


This is very true. I don't think I understood the need for rhythm until I played with other people.

I found the CD I got from this site very helpful:
http://www.paulcarman.com/store/home.php

It's more fun to play to than a metronome.

Re: Developing a sense of timing.
ten left thumbs #1475155 07/15/10 08:08 PM
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,375

Silver Supporter until Jan 11 2012
1000 Post Club Member
Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 11 2012
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,375
I spend a fair amount of time doing separate rhythm practice. I've gone so far as to buy a set of bongos so I can have practice doing different rhythms with either hand (useful at piano), but sometimes I just use one hand on either armrest of my comfy chair. I like to use a metronome that marks the first note of each measure, like the one on my DP or laptop.

I practice sight-reading rhythms from my piano sheet music or dedicated rhythm practice books (The Rhythm Bible is a good one), and then I take the rhythmic patterns that I found particularly enjoyable or challenging during sight reading, and use them to focus on refining my timing and steadying my beat.

I find that this drumming/tapping can be almost as much fun as playing piano, and it's been very helpful for improving my rhythm at the piano, as well as improving my sight-reading skills.


Please step aside. You're standing in your own way.
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1475196 07/15/10 09:26 PM
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 2,847
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 2,847
One way to develop good rhythm is to take up dance. You gotta feel it in your bones.


"Playing the piano is my greatest joy...period."......JP
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1476312 07/17/10 09:20 PM
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 43
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 43
I would encourage the usage of rhythm accompaniment if your keyboard comes with that feature.

It is helpful to practice with a metronome but may make you sound a bit robotic and could not feel the internal rhythm. When you practice, always start out slow, before gradually increasing the tempo. It's easier to play at a faster tempo, but at a slower pace, you'll need to really concentrate and feel your internal rhythm. There's no time line, just keep practicing and you will see an improvement with your timing.

Yoke Wong

Last edited by Yoke Wong; 07/18/10 01:25 PM.

Take Your Playing To The Next Level
http://www.pianomother.com
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
Yoke Wong #1482369 07/27/10 09:13 AM
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 10
P
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
P
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 10
Thank you people.
I have been using the metronome. Also I am thinking about using the rhythm accompaniment feature of my keyboard.

My problem was that I could not keep a steady beat and it still is. I am hopeful that I will find my internal rhythm and hopefully be able to keep a steady beat and be able to adapt to changes wherever necessary.


P.S. Its great out here in this forum. Thanks again.

Last edited by pb_core i7; 07/27/10 09:15 AM.
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1482388 07/27/10 09:48 AM
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 101
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 101
I had an issue in the beginning with rythm. Our natural rythm goes to the beat of our heart which can change. My teacher suggested that I start clapping the beats of each piece I am working on before playing it. Then while I play I count. I also use the metronome but I have found that the best method is the clapping and then counting.
Glasslove thanks for mentioning that book, I am going to look into it myself.


"Music is what feeling's sound like"

Adult Piano Adventures (The F.J.H Music Company)
RCM Prepatory
RCM Grade 1
RCM Grade 2 (working on)

RCM Theory
Hanon
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
PracticeTraxx #1485483 07/31/10 07:31 PM
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,588
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,588
just keep practicing and eventually it will get better..stick with it..keep practicing and working hard..it takes time


music to me is kind of like putting together pieces of a puzzle
i call it the paino because its where i put all my pain
Re: Developing a sense of timing.
pb_core i7 #1487355 08/03/10 01:29 PM
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,358
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,358
I always had a terrible sense of timing. I was often told to use the metronome but that always messed me up. I read that people with dyslexia (which I have) have timing issues,so I just assumed I'd never get better at it.

Well oddly my timing got much better when I took singing lessons. It's hard to say why. But, as human beings I think we all have a natural sense of timing. What I noticed was that I was thinking less about it. Especially once I got to know a song better. I would sometimes go through a song and tap it out first to get a sense of the timing before I played it. They thing is you have to feel it inside not just logically in your head. It's like the rhythm/timing comes from deep within. I also just started moving to the music (not dancing bc well that's just not a sight anyone wants to see). but just tapping or swaying to any music I heard on the radio or commercials on tv etc. I think once I started "allowing" the rythym to happen it got much better. In fact a couple of weeks ago I had a piano lesson with a new teacher and she said my timing was good. I was shocked bc that's always been a problem for me. Well not anymore!

Also, I think it may seem like your timing is off when you are learning a new song bc you are having to pay attention to so many things. I know I tend to slow down if I get stuck on a noted or something like that. So, when you are learning a new song make sure you play it slowly enough at first so you can play it evenly even through the rough spots.

Best of luck - you'll get it.


“The doubters said, "Man cannot fly," The doers said, "Maybe, but we'll try,"
And finally soared in the morning glow while non-believers watched from below.”
― Bruce Lee
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  BB Player 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
(ad) SWEETWATER Cyber Sale
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Roland LX706 Review
by Colin Miles - 12/04/20 06:41 AM
Best Headphones for Digital Piano - your experience
by lukasz-zsakul - 12/04/20 05:10 AM
Is the Hailun 218 solid spruce?
by Sonepica - 12/04/20 04:55 AM
Schiff talked about Bartók's style of playing
by symphonicdance - 12/04/20 01:46 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics203,254
Posts3,030,353
Members99,467
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4