2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Who's Online Now
66 members (achoo42, Chouca, AaronSF, chopinetto, 36251, accordeur, ChrisGoesPiano, 18 invisible), 526 guests, and 434 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
#1256586 08/26/09 02:03 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,981
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,981
The great Australian pianist, long a champion of obscure composers--Medtner amongst the most prominent of these--died last week:


OBITUARY: Geoffrey Tozer. Pianist. Born Mussoorie, India, November 5, 1954. Died Melbourne, August 20, age 54.

"PIANIST Geoffrey Tozer was one of the most gifted musicians this country has known. Born in the Indian Himalayas, he began piano lessons with his mother before moving to Australia at the age of four. A child prodigy, he gave his first public performance at age five at the St Kilda Town Hall; at eight he appeared on ABC television with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, playing Bach's Concerto in F minor. By 12 he had performed all five of Beethoven's piano concertos across Australia; two years later he was the youngest semi-finalist in history at the Leeds International Piano Competition.

In 1970, Tozer made his BBC Proms debut at the Royal Albert Hall, performing Mozart with the BBC Symphony Orchestra and Colin Davis. During the following years he performed widely across Europe and the US, receiving a host of awards, including a gold medal in the Arthur Rubinstein competition in Israel in 1980 and Hungary's Liszt Centenary medallion in 1986.

Despite this international success, Tozer struggled to support himself in Australia and in the mid-1980s he took a job teaching music at a school in Canberra.

There he met Paul Keating, then the treasurer, who was inspired by Tozer's "greatness and his poverty" to establish the Australian Artists Creative Fellowships for artists in mid-career.

Tozer was awarded two consecutive fellowships, allowing him to travel to London and immerse himself in recording. He recorded a staggering 36 discs for the Chandos label, championing the works of lesser-known composers.

His recording of the Medtner piano concertos won a Diapason d'Or prize and was nominated for a Grammy award in 1992; and his recording of Roberto Gerhard's Piano Concerto was awarded Britain's Gramophone Critics Choice for recording of the year in 1998.

Tozer's knowledge of the piano repertoire was encyclopedic and he thrilled audiences with his ability to improvise on any theme in any style. Extemporisation lay at the centre of his art: his performances, though technically commanding, unfolded with an unstudied freedom and spontaneity.

There was a copiousness to his talent that demanded an outlet and he was a generous teacher who gave unstintingly to students, frequently without payment. In recent years, he taught at the Australian National Academy of Music and at the University of Melbourne, where he was appointed piano fellow in 1998.

His student Leigh Harrold remembers him as "a gentle, humble man who was always generous with his time and spoke about music with a childlike awe and wonder that I never failed to find extremely moving".

Despite his gentlemanly manner, Tozer had a mischievous sense of humour and was not averse to controversy.

"He was wonderfully and terribly outspoken and suffered every benefit and disadvantage from being outspoken," a senior music industry figure recalls. In 1997, Tozer announced he was moving to Europe to escape the provincialism of Melbourne; friends observe that had he followed through with this threat, he might have enjoyed more frequent engagements in this country.

In 1996, Tozer was devastated by the death of his mother, followed by that of his long-time manager, Reuben Fineburg, in 1997. In the absence of this support, he struggled to manage his career and his health began a gradual decline. However, he continued to give concerts and toured frequently to China. His 2001 performance of the Yellow River Concerto was broadcast to an audience of more than 80 million.

The same year he gave a performance in Berlin of the music of Artur Schnabel, before Schnabel's family. This had special resonance for him, as Schnabel's student Maria Curcio had been one of his cherished teachers, alongside Eileen Ralf, Keith Humble and Theodore Lettvin. His final performances took place in Bendigo in June this year, with cellist David Pereira, a colleague he greatly admired.

One of Tozer's many enthusiasms was Australian pianist Noel Mewton-Wood, whose brilliance and precocity - and untimely death - foreshadowed his own.

Tozer died at home last week from complications resulting from liver failure. Keating describes this loss as a national tragedy, but it has hardly made headlines.

"Had he been a boneheaded footballer who was biffing fellow players and chasing women down hotel corridors late at night he would have probably had a premium on his career," Keating observes. "But to have been among one of a handful of the world's greatest pianists with all of that learning and comprehension was not quite up to it."

Nonetheless, Tozer leaves a substantial legacy: in his discs for the Chandos label; in his copious recordings archived at the ABC, many of which I hope will be released; in the joy he has brought audiences worldwide; and in the inspiration he offered to a younger generation of Australian musicians.

The place I like to remember him is at ANAM, 10 years ago, where I was one of a small group of piano students huddled around him at the piano while he played us Medtner sonata after Medtner sonata.

An authoritative, mesmerising sound poured from the instrument as afternoon gave way to evening, then to night, but his face above it was that of a child, eyes sparkling with joy, innocent before music."




In my brief interactions with him (trying to set up some 2 piano concerts which sadly never came to pass) he was unfailingly kind, generous and a gentleman. His artistry will be sorely missed.

Last edited by Thracozaag; 08/26/09 02:06 PM.

"I'm a concert pianist--that's a pretentious way of saying I'm unemployed at the moment."--Oscar Levant

http://www.youtube.com/kojiattwood
https://www.giftedmusicschool.org/
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
Thracozaag #1256609 08/26/09 02:36 PM
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 8,453
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 8,453
Never heard of him, but RIP. frown


Close only counts in horseshoes, hand grenades, and nuclear weapons.
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
Horowitzian #1256715 08/26/09 04:40 PM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 3,919
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 3,919
Thanks for bringing him to our attention, Koji.

Discs available through Arkiv Music are HERE.


There is no end of learning. -Robert Schumann Rules for Young Musicians
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
Thracozaag #1256736 08/26/09 05:04 PM
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 6,275
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 6,275
Your post is right to say it's "hardly made headlines" - I didn't know he'd died until one of my students told me. There is an obit in today's paper however:
Geoffrey Tozer


Du holde Kunst...
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
currawong #1256742 08/26/09 05:15 PM
Joined: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,869
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,869
Check out Tozer's playing of the Andante Cantabile, Op.1 No.1 from Eight Mood Pictures on Vol.3 of his complete Medtner.

Exquisite.

Music sample here:

Medtner Tozer Vol.3


Mel


"Love has nothing to do with what you are expecting to get, only what you are expecting to give, which is everything. You give because you love and cannot help giving." Katharine Hepburn
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
dannylux #1256748 08/26/09 05:35 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 5,845
B
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 5,845
noooooooooooooo

Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
Brendan #1256779 08/26/09 06:23 PM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 959
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 959
RIP.
There are also several recordings of him on Youtube, and also some recital videos. I just listened to his recording of Medtner's op. 11/1 - warm, poetic sound, comtemplative, more inward- than outward-oriented. I like it a lot.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kH12jCIrjM

Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
pianovirus #1256866 08/26/09 09:11 PM
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 556
J
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 556
Koji, this post was news to me!

to think that I was always over-looking his Medtner recordings!

another loss for the music world...

Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
pianovirus #1256869 08/26/09 09:17 PM
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 8,453
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 8,453
Originally Posted by pianovirus
RIP.
There are also several recordings of him on Youtube, and also some recital videos. I just listened to his recording of Medtner's op. 11/1 - warm, poetic sound, comtemplative, more inward- than outward-oriented. I like it a lot.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kH12jCIrjM


Thanks for linking to that. I may have to get some of his Medtner. smile


Close only counts in horseshoes, hand grenades, and nuclear weapons.
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
Horowitzian #1256898 08/26/09 10:36 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,733
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,733
What a loss.

I actually prefer Tozer's Medtner sonata cycle (on Chandos) to Hamelin's.


Die Krebs gehn zurücke,
Die Stockfisch bleiben dicke,
Die Karpfen viel fressen,
Die Predigt vergessen.

Die Predigt hat g'fallen.
Sie bleiben wie alle.
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
Janus K. Sachs #1257717 08/28/09 08:09 AM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 794
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 794
Very sad story indeed - there's a reasonably good page on this guy on Wikipedia...


Justin
-------
Bach English Suite #5
Scarlatti Sonata K141 . L422
Mozart Sonata K333
Schubert Impromptu opus 90 D899
Schubert Moment Musicaux opus 94 D780
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
jnod #1257722 08/28/09 08:15 AM
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 10,856
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 10,856
me dummy.

Last edited by keyboardklutz; 08/28/09 09:44 AM.
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
keyboardklutz #1257763 08/28/09 09:07 AM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 580
H
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
H
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 580
A "national tragedy" and a tragedy for us all.

Please look at the new thread regarding the Unsung Heroes E-cital

Last edited by heidiv; 08/28/09 11:26 AM.
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
heidiv #1257789 08/28/09 09:38 AM
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 10,856
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 10,856
What an amazing musician! You couldn't tell from his bearing if he was playing forte or piano. From pianissimo to fortissimo, it just seems to come out of his mind!


Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
keyboardklutz #1257812 08/28/09 09:54 AM
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,283
I
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,283
Such sad news ... i agree with Janus, his Medtner sonatas are my favourite. I would 've thought he was older though - RIP

Thanks Koji

Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
keyboardklutz #1257956 08/28/09 01:19 PM
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 9,392
A
9000 Post Club Member
Offline
9000 Post Club Member
A
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 9,392
Originally Posted by keyboardklutz
What an amazing musician! You couldn't tell from his bearing if he was playing forte or piano. From pianissimo to fortissimo, it just seems to come out of his mind!


What a poignant tribute (such a wistful morsel from Liszt's late years) to a great pianist who gave us so much. Goodnight, dearest.


Jason
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
argerichfan #1258133 08/28/09 05:04 PM
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,651
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,651
Has everyone had a chance to peruse the following proposal?:

http://www.pianoworld.com/forum/ubb...sung%20Heroes%20E-cital.html#Post1257761

I can think of no more fitting epitaph to this under-appreciated artist than a recital in honor of him and the unsung champions of the score he sought to honor during his life.


http://www.ecital.net
Wikicital: A collaborative effort to build a knowledgebase of classical music history combined with examples. Your chance to both perform and write...

Don't click here!
Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
argerichfan #1258140 08/28/09 05:13 PM
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,651
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,651
kbklutz, Jason, that's probably my favorite Liszt piece. Thank you for honoring this man's memory.

Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
Thracozaag #1279147 10/02/09 04:41 AM
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 47
P
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 47
Paul Keating's eulogy (delivered yesterday) can be found here.

Beware of the abridged version on the home pages today of both The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald. They at least have a link to the real one.

Re: Geoffrey Tozer (1954-2009)
PlayWellOneDay #1279305 10/02/09 10:43 AM
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,133
B
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,133
I'm somewhat behind in my reading and am only now seeing this. What a loss! The world will be a much poorer place without his artistry. I've owned and treasured his complete Medtner sonatas and concertos for years. They set the standard for other pianists incredibly high. I'm going to play them today in his honor.


Greg
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
(ad) SWEETWATER Cyber Sale
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Yamaha C2x and C3x Cost???
by navi9187 - 12/02/20 04:10 PM
plz help ID this piece :)
by Chummy - 12/02/20 03:25 PM
CLP 735 vs CA49 vs HP704
by Einaudio - 12/02/20 02:49 PM
Is there a term for this?
by TBell - 12/02/20 02:04 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics203,219
Posts3,029,758
Members99,451
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4