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Re: Future of classical music?
JdhPiano924 #1163558 03/16/09 12:08 PM
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Classical music will never die. I'm 21 and I got more white hair than a 50 yr old person hehe. My little brother is 17 and he also likes classical music. In fact, his senior project is about Mozart. My brother and I grew into classical music, and I gotta say I've been listening to classical music for a long time.

Re: Future of classical music?
Acquiescence #1163604 03/16/09 01:59 PM
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I doubt if classical music, measured in terms of percentage of the total population, was ever more widely popular than it is now. The limitations of previous historical times—limitations of leisure time, of distribution, of a market mentality--just didn’t allow for much music at all. Someone above stated that less than 5% of the US population regularly listened to classical music. I don't know if the figure is accurate, but if we assume it is, does it seem likely that there ever a time when more than 5% of the American population regularly listened to classical music?

I'd say classical music is growing in terms of audience and participants. The NY Times reported about a year ago that there are an estimated 20 million Chinese studying piano. There was no estimate given for how many were studying the violin and other classical instruments of the west, but I’d guess it’s quite a large number. And what about Korea and Japan? The East has already made its mark in classical music here in the West, and it will be even more far reaching and profound in the future. And I’d guess that there will soon be huge audiences opening up in the East. Think about it. That’s why Deutsche Grammophon signed Lang Lang.

Look around. There seems to be more professional and semi-professional orchestras around now than ever before, and no shortage of highly trained musicians to fill all those seats. When I was young there was only one venue for classical instrumental music; the Minneapolis Symphony founded in 1903. There wasn't anything else closer than Chicago. But about thirty-five years ago, one of the finest chamber orchestras in the world was founded just a few miles away in St. Paul. It didn't put the Minneapolis Symphony (Now the Minnesota Orchestra) out of business. Both groups are thriving. In the wake of that, Duluth, Minnesota greatly improved their orchestra and it is very worthwhile listening to. Sioux Falls, South Dakota has a first rate concert hall, and a small ensemble to go with it, and again, the music produced is of a high quality and draws an enthusiastic crowd. Omaha, Nebraska has an orchestra. Des Moines, Iowa has one and a decent opera company to boot. Greenbay, Wisconsin has two orchestras. Frankly, there are too many to mention. And that's just the American midwest. Does anyone doubt that this isn't happening all over the country?

It is true that classical music will never again enjoy the dominance it held from the beginning of musical notation to more recent times. But that is because comparatively little attention was given to music at all. No one had the time or the technical ability to collect and distribute music, and even if they did, most people didn’t have the time to listen to it. Musicology, ethnomusicology, the sheet music industry, radio broadcasting, leisure time and a market mentality: all of these created the possibility for millions upon millions of people to get involved in some kind of music and make it a meaningful part of their lives.

This is a good thing that has happened. We have no need to fear.

Oh, we may look around and worry that we make up a far smaller percentage of the whole—and we do--but there are more people interested in classical music than ever before, and many, many more are actively interested in music of some kind. And many of those people may ultimately find more enjoyment in our classical music--and conversely, we in theirs. This does not threaten us.

Classical music has value. We’ll do just fine.

Tomasino


"Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do so with all thy might." Ecclesiastes 9:10

Re: Future of classical music?
JdhPiano924 #1163742 03/16/09 06:41 PM
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i dont see why people can't wear just informal clothes to a concert or something--- the suit does not make them play better.


Re: Future of classical music?
Acquiescence #1163750 03/16/09 07:05 PM
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Tomasino, your post was uplifting. Thank you.

Acquiescence, how one dresses for a concert is optional. Personally, I enjoy getting dressed up because it makes a special occasion more special. I also enjoy seeing the orchestra dressed in black or white tie on a Saturday night for the same reason.

Do what you like; just wear something.


Best regards,

Deborah
Re: Future of classical music?
Acquiescence #1163751 03/16/09 07:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Acquiescence
i dont see why people can't wear just informal clothes to a concert or something--- the suit does not make them play better.


My impression is that many and perhaps the majority of the younger performers(and even some really old people over 40 or 50)are not wearing ties and jackets when they perform(except at maybe the most prestigious venues). They often wear a black shirt and black pants.

I wonder wheter there was a time when even the audience was "expected" to wear ties and jackets at a classical concert?

Re: Future of classical music?
Acquiescence #1163936 03/17/09 06:06 AM
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For me it was always a little bit of stage presence, I felt more confident in a suit then I did jeans. I mean even now I will at least wear a turtleneck. The original point I was trying to make was that I come from a rather conservative background. That I am not liberal about a lot of those things.

Re: Future of classical music?
JdhPiano924 #1164012 03/17/09 10:49 AM
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I think whatever the orchestra/conductor wear it should be uniform in terms of formality.

At a recent Seattle Symphony concert we had a guest conductor who chose to wear a jacket and turtleneck at a Saturday night concert. The orchestra was dressed in white tie. The disparity gave the impression of disrespect on the part of the guest conductor.


Best regards,

Deborah
Re: Future of classical music?
Acquiescence #1164031 03/17/09 11:47 AM
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Beethoven is immortal. 95% of the crap that is broadcasted these days won't last long.

Re: Future of classical music?
gooddog #1164096 03/17/09 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by gooddog
It would break my heart if the music faded away and if the symphonic orchestras had to close down because of lack of interest and funding. Where are we headed?


Don't worry, Deborah. Classical music is going nowhere but up. There are today many more musicians and orchestras in the world than ever before.

A generation weaned on text messaging is surely going to have a short attention span. But there is always a rebound. The next generation may well bore us with an obsessive interest in Mahler's 8th! (Well, maybe not wink

In the US, in particular, silly mistakes have been made. Orchestras have been poorly managed. The Philadelphia orchestra is the latest in a string. Managing an orchestra is a very expensive undertaking, and it's especially difficult if the managers are amateurs who eschew 'marketing' as being 'above them'.

The internet has changed everything very fast. No-one can keep up. How is DG supposed to sell its CD's if everyone can listen to the same piece in quite reasonable quality, by one of the truly great artists of the past, for free on Youtube?

If I'm right, only yesterday Seattle lost a newspaper, and in general, the future of 'news' is far more iffy than the future of the concert hall. The moguls that control media that have complacently relied on print are climbing the walls. Even the NYT is not safe. 'Quality News' however is. We just don't quite know yet in what form it will be disseminated.

It won't help you in Seattle to know that season tickets for the Berliner Philharmoniker, or even the Muenchener Philharmoniker are at least as hard to come by as season tickets for the Seahawks. (Um. Did I pick the wrong team!?)

You don't have to go even this far. By all accounts, Esa-Pekka Salonen and an enlightened management has rejuvenated the LA Philharmonic, elevating it to the ranks of top orchestras. As Philadelphia bows out, LA takes over. Maybe someone who lives in the LA area could comment on this. It seems to me an interesting development that I have so far been able to 'view' only from afar.





Rob
Re: Future of classical music?
rrb #1164113 03/17/09 02:39 PM
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Re: Future of classical music?
pianoloverus #1164120 03/17/09 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
[...]
I wonder wheter there was a time when even the audience was "expected" to wear ties and jackets at a classical concert?


Yes, young man, in my lifetime!

Moreover, my mother would never even go "downtown" without wearing a hat and gloves and an "appropriate" dress, and we were at the lower end of the middle class.

Regards,


BruceD
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Re: Future of classical music?
izaldu #1164135 03/17/09 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by izaldu
Beethoven is immortal. 95% of the crap that is broadcasted these days won't last long.


And Beethoven makes you smarter.
http://musicthatmakesyoudumb.virgil.gr/music.php

Re: Future of classical music?
the nosy ape #1164174 03/17/09 04:33 PM
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So is the basic problem not that classical music is declining but rather that it has to spread itself out more? So appears to be thinning out?

Re: Future of classical music?
BruceD #1164175 03/17/09 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
[...]
I wonder wheter there was a time when even the audience was "expected" to wear ties and jackets at a classical concert?


Yes, young man, in my lifetime!

Moreover, my mother would never even go "downtown" without wearing a hat and gloves and an "appropriate" dress, and we were at the lower end of the middle class.


Well that's the first time anyone called me young in a while. Exactly when did the audience wear mostly ties and jackets?

I knew someone who actually did his laundry in a tie and jacket. Hard to believe, but true.

Re: Future of classical music?
JdhPiano924 #1164178 03/17/09 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by jdhampton924
So is the basic problem not that classical music is declining but rather that it has to spread itself out more? So appears to be thinning out?


What makes you think it's not declining *at least in the U.S.*? If orchestras and classical music stations are being shut down and the average age of people that do go to concerts is increasing(a high percentage above 60 in my experience) doesn't that seem to indicate a decline?

Re: Future of classical music?
pianoloverus #1164185 03/17/09 04:55 PM
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Hello,

I am just a lurker who only reads in this pianist forum, but I was always curious as to how old some of members are here.

Please excuse my rudeness or directness... But would you mind kindly sharing at most a rounded figure of your age? smile

Re: Future of classical music?
Avantgardenabi #1164190 03/17/09 05:07 PM
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Question for R. R. Bentley,

What's the problem with the Philadelphia orchestra you refer to? I know they're not very well endowed for an orchestra of that reputation, but that's always been the case. I thought they were doing fine.

Tomasino



"Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do so with all thy might." Ecclesiastes 9:10

Re: Future of classical music?
Avantgardenabi #1164197 03/17/09 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Avantgardenabi
Hello,

I am just a lurker who only reads in this pianist forum, but I was always curious as to how old some of members are here.

Please excuse my rudeness or directness... But would you mind kindly sharing at most a rounded figure of your age? smile
Who is this request addressed to?

Re: Future of classical music?
pianoloverus #1164207 03/17/09 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by jdhampton924
So is the basic problem not that classical music is declining but rather that it has to spread itself out more? So appears to be thinning out?


What makes you think it's not declining *at least in the U.S.*? If orchestras and classical music stations are being shut down and the average age of people that do go to concerts is increasing(a high percentage above 60 in my experience) doesn't that seem to indicate a decline?


I was just asking a question, some people are saying what you are saying others are like there are more people then ever. Kind of hard to get the real picture.

Re: Future of classical music?
JdhPiano924 #1164208 03/17/09 05:45 PM
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Dear Aventgardenabi,

You must be addressing me--but you go first. What's your age, what's your weight, and then um, kindly share a rounded figure of your income? I enjoy walks around the lake, holding hands, and intimate evenings at home.

Tomasino


"Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do so with all thy might." Ecclesiastes 9:10

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