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Active Threads | Active Posts | Unanswered Today | Since Yesterday | This Week
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
10 minutes ago
Piano-wise I vote for Roland.

I dislike the piano samples of Nords very much. In my mind they sound very artificially, and with good headphones or speakers it is especially clearly heard. Besides the action of Nord Piano keyboard is imo much inferior to that of Roland.

I would say Nord Piano is a toy, most suitable for pop musicians, whereas Roland RD is a serious and universal professional instrument.

RD-700NX and 800 are now the dominating professional instruments among pianists in my region, I guess RD-2000 will soon join them, too.
10 567 Read More
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
29 minutes ago
Originally Posted by CyberGene
Regarding Pianoid, something to have in mind is that's rather a Proof of Concept project, not a production version, not either a beta or alpha release. The guys wanted to find some ways to move that to a dedicated CPU. So, of course it sounds ridiculous compared to a mature product like Pianoteq but I find some aspects of its sound and some of the demos still better than Pianoteq, not as a whole, but just as a character. Unfortunately it seems the project is dead. I am not impressed by the saturation point reached in the Pianoteq development. They simply offer different "models" which to my ears is simply different existing piano parameters fed to their underlying engine which is making only tiny steps. YMMV


How Pianoteq is developing currently is their optimum business strategy given the market environment they're operating in.

If there are better modelling systems existing, Pianoteq might be researching these at a nascent stage with the view that tech improvements might make them viable; however, at this stage, they are where they're at, no point in asking for more.

If you think about it, different pianos are simply different variations on the same mechanical concept and do sound kind of samey compared to other keyboard instruments (although qualities differs within the set). Similarly, as the same underlying principles exist in the algorithms under the hood of Pianoteq, you'd expect close similarities in quality of sound and in some aspects of tone.

With regard to Pianoid: it sounds like it's been recorded on an early grammaphone. It's tone quality if developed I doubt would be recognisable compared to these crude recordings. I'm not excited by it because of its sound: maybe I am by its technological potential.
101 4,341 Read More
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
50 minutes ago
Originally Posted by gwing
For use with keyboards (actually for use with pretty much anything except a high quality headphone amp in a hi-fi system) I'd suggest going with something more like 30 Ohm.

80 Ohm headphones generally require a stronger headphone amp section to drive them to full volume. I haven't the specification for ES110 but I suspect it will manage OK with these 80's. Using 30ish Ohm headphones will give it an easier time.

Stay away from the 250 Ohm phones unless you are actually using a dedicated headphone amplifier (or very special and unusual quality bit of kit).


I don't agree, every device that's not portable like an MP3 player of phone/tablet is good enough for driving 250 Ohm. I have the DT770 myself and I really love them. I use them on my RD-700sx, my LX-7, PC's, Hifi, ... I preferred the coiled cable over the straight one, so that's another bonus of the 250 Ohm model :-)
6 213 Read More
Piano Forum
1 hour ago
Originally Posted by BerndAB
Buying a grand piano for brain is triple choice.

.......


Let the soul of a piano speak to your soul.

Then it is no longer your choice-by-brain ...

(but pheew... all technical criteria fulfilled....).

DON'T give in to any "pushy" sales tactics like putting financial or timely pressure ("best offer west of New York City, proven" , "I have another eagerly striving customer"...). There will always be a next grand to come.

Wait for a "Choice by Soul" experience. Then there will never be a question if the choice once was a right and justified one...


‘choice by soul’ was my criteria......I am just an intermediate pianist, and I certainly could’ve taken someone much more experienced with me to go through a checklist. I intentionally did not since the player would be only me. ... and the choice would be personal.

I knew within a few minutes the piano was my ‘soul choice’ but forced myself not to immediately jump up and say ‘I’ll take it!’ to the private seller. I just knew the piano felt good to my fingers, and I had never sounded better...... over a year later, and no regrets. I want to play her just to touch the keys and hear the sound.

As Goldilocks would say ‘It was just right’. ..... for me, and for me alone. Whether it would pass an objective checklist is of no concern.
26 662 Read More
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
1 hour ago
Originally Posted by computerpro3
So, how much did everyone pay for your NV10? I am thinking of putting in an offer of $9999 - it's currently listed at $11.5. Is this reasonable?


Got mine for 8.000 € (original price: 8.999 €) including VAT.
1,336 117,149 Read More
Piano Tuner-Technicians Forum
2 hours ago
Yes
18 1,093 Read More
Pianist Corner - Non Classical
2 hours ago
Thumbs up for improv!!!
6 158 Read More
Pianist Corner
2 hours ago
Originally Posted by akc42
Originally Posted by dsw67

I started learning Piano about 2 years ago because I wanted to learn to play this piece. The music is readily available, but I'm not sure about the exact fingerings. Does anyone know where I may obtain music for this piece that includes fingerings?


I started to learn this piece 2 1/2 months in from restarting after a 56 year gap where I had got to grade 3 (scraped) as a child. It followed the first movement of the Moonlight sonata.

I use the ABRSM Signature Series Edited by Barry Cooper, which has a few fingerings, but not a massive amount. https://www.amazon.com/Sonata-minor-Op-Pathetique-Signature/dp/1860967469 (although mine came from Amazon UK). I try to follow the fingering, although there were a couple of places where I preferred not to, but I think that is a slight detraction as I am not getting finger legato as a result (using the pedal)

It took me 4 1/2 months (of between 2 and 3 hours practice a day) to reach a stage where I was prepared to submit my recording to the ABF Quarterly Recitals (#50). http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthreads.php/topics/2736549/recital-50-may-15-2018.html

When I started I thought I had bitten off more than I could chew, but my teacher said go for it. It took me a complete month to be even able to play the first 16 measures. All along my teacher wanted me to get voicing and dynamics built in as I was learning it. Getting the right notes for the rest came shortly afterwards, but getting the voicing, dynamics, etc took the rest of the time. I still feel that there is a lot more I could do to improve, but I have put it aside for now to learn some Bach. I plan on bring it back to performance level every 6 months or so for the next couple of years (Josh Wright on You Tube says that doing it three times will keep it in your fingers for life)

Good luck with your endevours

Originally Posted by akc42
Originally Posted by dsw67

I started learning Piano about 2 years ago because I wanted to learn to play this piece. The music is readily available, but I'm not sure about the exact fingerings. Does anyone know where I may obtain music for this piece that includes fingerings?


I started to learn this piece 2 1/2 months in from restarting after a 56 year gap where I had got to grade 3 (scraped) as a child. It followed the first movement of the Moonlight sonata.

I use the ABRSM Signature Series Edited by Barry Cooper, which has a few fingerings, but not a massive amount. https://www.amazon.com/Sonata-minor-Op-Pathetique-Signature/dp/1860967469 (although mine came from Amazon UK). I try to follow the fingering, although there were a couple of places where I preferred not to, but I think that is a slight detraction as I am not getting finger legato as a result (using the pedal)

It took me 4 1/2 months (of between 2 and 3 hours practice a day) to reach a stage where I was prepared to submit my recording to the ABF Quarterly Recitals (#50). http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthreads.php/topics/2736549/recital-50-may-15-2018.html

When I started I thought I had bitten off more than I could chew, but my teacher said go for it. It took me a complete month to be even able to play the first 16 measures. All along my teacher wanted me to get voicing and dynamics built in as I was learning it. Getting the right notes for the rest came shortly afterwards, but getting the voicing, dynamics, etc took the rest of the time. I still feel that there is a lot more I could do to improve, but I have put it aside for now to learn some Bach. I plan on bring it back to performance level every 6 months or so for the next couple of years (Josh Wright on You Tube says that doing it three times will keep it in your fingers for life)

Good luck with your endevours

Yes, best of luck. I guess my more relevant post was banned. Awesome!
5 150 Read More
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
2 hours ago
Most electro-mechanical devices will need some adjustment or repair after a few months or years of regular use. That says nothing about their lifetime longevity though. Your Casio likely uses rubber or silicon pad switches onto a graphite contact, same as in a TV remote control, these are susceptible to wear, dirt, dust, grease, or just flex failure. A lot of people treat their DP as a piece of technology, there’s always a better one around the corner in some respect after a few years. However once you have one you really really like it can become part of the home. Look for extended warranty’s with good or easy access to service or support and carry on.
9 470 Read More
Adult Beginners Forum
2 hours ago
Originally Posted by squidbot
Well, this was my 2 year recital. I played the pieces quite well to myself, during lessons and in my piano meetup. Got to the recital, nerves kicked in and I blew it. I forgot to play one whole section of my waltz, had multiple finger fumbles and just generally had a poor showing.

On the bright side, my ability to recover from errors and not having to start over was a win over last year!

Anyway, for all you AB's, you're not alone if you've had a bad recital. For the record though, I find them valuable and really do want to be able to play in front of an audience one day and actually entertain them smile In fact, my teacher had been considering adding a winter recital, and I think I've convinced him it would be a good thing to have more.

Anyway, back to my regular practicing!

Don't give up!!!
It will go better next time. Do 150 gigs.
It will not bother after that.
20 995 Read More
Piano Teachers Forum
3 hours ago
Originally Posted by BNicole
Originally I thought teaching young beginners would be a good start because I consider myself intermediate, not yet advanced. Therefore, I could start with teaching the basics at an elementary level which kids would understand.

However, after reading all of the comments here, I can see how this might not work. Teaching children requires possibly great knowledge of piano, because one would be setting the overarching foundation for kids to build their piano skills.

I think I might try taking lessons again or joining a church group to further enhance my skills, and then I could think about teaching beginners who are older (middle school, high school, etc.)

On second thought, you might want to play piano for several more years and get to advanced level (Beethoven Sonatas, Chopin Scherzos, Rachmaninoff Preludes). It is not a requirement to play advanced repertoire as a piano teacher, but that would definitely give you more credibility for understanding the instrument.

For many years, I have been getting transfer students whose previous teachers did not play piano very well. Many didn't even major in piano. The amount of damage done to these students is beyond fixing.
15 445 Read More
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
3 hours ago
It sounds great for most part ! I really like the added extra’s like staccato samples.
But i hear some minor tuning flaws and the piano seems to be a bit dry.
And i mean not in a dry/wet room/reverb kinda way, but ‘dry’ in what is to be expected in an older piano.
I have dialed in a superb rich tone in my CinePiano and i wonder if this 1955 Steinway can produce the same lush sounding individual notes.

It’s a steal however for that price and i recently bought Embertone’s Joshua Bell violin ....... what an outstanding solo violin that is......but it was not cheap at all for a solo violin vst.
Extraordinary that Embertone uses such a different pricetag for this one.
36 1,195 Read More
Adult Beginners Forum
4 hours ago
I suggest changing the name of this thread to NEW YORK Performance Anxiety Meet up - or something similar - you'll catch attention from people in your area faster.

And/or --- post in the Just for Fun area -- I know that has a lower visitor rate but anyone using the "Active threads" feature will see it .

I hope you can get a wee group together.
I managed to try a couple of zoom performances, and it's true that it isn't as stressful as live -but it's pretty close. I played with people I know well, so maybe that helped me relax. If I had played for strangers I think the video/live performance would be very similar in terms of stress.

Remember - it doesn't have to be at your home - find a local bar/café and have your first meeting there and then decide .

Good luck!
5 172 Read More
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
4 hours ago
When you overload a digital system, the results are unmercifully bad.

The Zoom should have a "Limiter" option, in its recording menu. The limiter will reduce the level of loud signals, and leave the soft signals alone. In principle, you should avoid using the limiter, and reduce the overall recording level so that your loudest playing doesn't overload the recorder.

But in practice, pianos have a really large dynamic range. And it may give you better results to use the limiter, and set your recording level a bit higher.

You'll work it out, I'm sure.

I have an H4 (pre-N), and really love it. Its mic's aren't ideal, but you can buy a pair of Behringer C2's (which are better, IMHO) for around $60. That's still "bargain bin", as audio gear goes.

Next, you'll be asking questions about Audacity . . . <g>
41 1,111 Read More
Pianist Corner
5 hours ago
Thank you all very much for the input.

Re: the LH - I'll continue to tinker with the 4-1-3-2 - fingering (using forearm rotation) since everyone seems to swear by it, but, quite frankly, the 3-1-3-1-3-1 etc. feels much more natural to me, and I'm able to play it smoothly.

Bennevis and Kenny Cheng both recommended starting the RH trills on the upper note. At first this suggestion threw me because in just about every performance I've heard of the sonata, the trills start on the lower (principal) note.

In a quick survey of current youtube recordings, the following artists began the trills on the lower note: Joao Pires, Sokolov, Cziffra, Schnabel, Barenboim, Richter, Gilels, Kraus and Goode. Arrau started the first two trills on the upper note, but played the 3rd trill starting on the lower note. Only Dinu Lipatti (bless his heart) began all three trills on the upper note.

That led me to do a little research into accepted performance practices of the Classical period (which I should have done in the first place). crazy Of course there are always exceptions, but IN GENERAL it appears that trills in Baroque and Classical music should start on the upper (auxiliary) note. Beginning with music AFTER Mozart trills were played starting on the lower (principal) note.

SO - I just tried playing all of the trills starting on the upper note, and added the LH with the 3-1-3-1-3-1 fingering - and everything fell into place. I think this will work...even up to tempo. grin.

Thanks again for the suggestions !!

4 141 Read More
Piano Forum
5 hours ago
if the folks here like 19th century romantic period piano music, maestro Phil Jones a.k.a. Carey communicates the music with a true affinity and knowledge (incl. rarely performed Schumann); his youtube channel is very much recommended.
87 5,894 Read More
Pianist Corner
7 hours ago
The Ossia cadenza in Rachmaninoff's 3rd concerto, first movement uses the lowest note of the piano.

It's a fairly easy note to hit. The notes a few measures before and a few measures after it? Not so much.
23 643 Read More
Piano Forum
7 hours ago
Carey is correct, however that doesn't really matter. What matters most is that YOU like the feel of the action, whatever the technology or the manufacturer. Have you tried this piano yet?
15 498 Read More
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
8 hours ago
Originally Posted by MacMacMac
If everyone you've helped pays up ...
Originally Posted by Charles Cohen
... you probably have to ... initialize a USB drive before you record onto it.
If that's the problem, you owe me a beer.
... you'll be awash in beer. smile


Yamaha did a _really_ good job in hiding that information, and it took a while to tease it out. Hence the beer payoff.

There are worse things than swimming in donated beer.<g>
8 219 Read More
Piano Forum
8 hours ago
Thanks!

Quick update: Fred was in touch with MH and it turns out that the theee AAs that they have at the factory are satin, not polished. A polished will be coming off the line in about a month. We’re goung to wait for that one and then do our comparison. So patience is definitely needed at this point...
5 385 Read More
Pianist Corner
8 hours ago
Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by gooddog
Just a few caveats on the House of Troy grand piano lamp that attaches to the music desk: vibration from playing loosens the bulbs which is very annoying. The bulb size is unusual and requires a trip to a specialty bulb store. The lamp prevents you from closing the music desk. The lighting is great but I'm planning to replace mine with a House of Troy floor model that has LED lights.


I would recommend you compare with the Cocoweb led floor model before you make a decision: dimmable, fully adjustable and great coverage of the music rack.

Thanks. I’ll check it out!
6 155 Read More
Piano Forum
8 hours ago
Thanks GC and Rich. We are loving the Baldwin. Rich, organic sound with a lot of range in dynamics. Powerful for the room. It needed a rug right away and I may treat a wall and put somembass trapping in (Similar to what I made for our recording studio) to allow it to really be opened up in here without sounding muddy.

I’d gotten so used to Yamahas etc. This warm American tone of this Baldwin reminds me of the family Steinway M down the road from here. Stay tuned to the member recordings for a demo.
11 393 Read More
Pianist Corner
9 hours ago
This is always a difficult subject for me to weigh in on, because I really do not want to come across like I am a "professional" level pianist - I am certainly not. But this is also a subject I feel very passionately about since I have lived it to some extent. I think my path to my current level of piano is somewhat unique (or at least rare), and I think that it is a pretty fascinating one from an objective standpoint.

For context, I dabbled in piano a bit when I was younger but didn't take it seriously until age 16. To give an idea:

Age 16: didn't know what a triad was, couldn't read music, level was a scarlatti sonata
Age 29: music degree, am comfortable technically with pretty much anything in the standard rep

Originally Posted by bennevis


Which got me thinking - do we inadvertently set ceilings for ourselves for what we are able to achieve at the piano?




Yes, absolutely. And I think we do it with most things in life.

I truly believe that the most important key to my progression (along with time and consistency) was that I didn't realize how difficult it was supposed to be. If you look back at some of my embarrassing posts from when I first joined the forum, you will see me asking absolutely ridiculous questions like "Gonna learn Rach 3! Any recommended cuts?" That should illustrate just how little I knew about classical music and piano in general - clearly I had no business playing any concerti back then, but I had a teacher who was able to reign in that naivety and focus it on less daunting (but still above my level) works.

It was kind of an interesting experiment - my teacher was handed a kid with basically no experience or ability to read music, and was told "Get him ready for auditions in two years." She didn't even really have the option to take the "standard" or "recommended" approach of building a solid foundation, etc. We just had to give it a shot, and she had to come up with a very unorthodox path to get there given the time constraints. I played my audition pieces quite badly, but still - after basically two years of piano I was able to play a WTC P&F, Chopin Etude, and Beethoven Sonata barely good enough to get into a couple of music schools. But what next?


Quote
Of course, I don't mean that all of us have the potential to become concert pianists.


Perhaps not everyone does, but I bet a lot more of us do than we think. That being said, potential is only one piece of the puzzle. The right pieces of the puzzle all have to be in place from an environmental standpoint as well (available time to practice, socioeconomic ability to get a piano, afford to work less and practice more, exposure to music, etc, etc)

I was never happy with my playing in college, and sorely felt that I lacked the technique the truly "gifted" students had. I was always that student that "had potential, BUT......" It was very frustrating for me, but I kept practicing. This was the first time that I became aware of how difficult acquiring the technique to be able to fluently play anything in the standard repertoire was.


Quote
But I remember that eight years ago, I had a pile of piano scores in a big box that I'd never successfully tackled and I was convinced I would never become good enough to play them properly. Then I bought my first piano: a high-end digital. For the first time in my life, I could practice at any time of the day or night when not at work, without time limit or hindrance from anyone, because I used headphones. I thought I'd take another look at those scores, one by one. They were still as difficult as I always thought they were. (Gaspard never gets easier just because you've had the score in a box for decades and dream about performing it......). But with no teacher, no time limitation, no worries, no looming exams, no academic studies that take precedence, there was nothing to stop me plugging away at the music, starting again at the beginning (always a good place to start, as Julie Andrews reminded us in The Sound of Music). Still not much joy, still too difficult - or was it? Slowly by surely, things begin to come together, just by returning to the score again and again, all the while learning & playing lots of other stuff in between, anything challenging that looks interesting and that helps build more dexterity and control.

Like Andrew Wiles who, on the way towards proving Fermat's last theorem, supplied the proofs for other conjectures thumb, I learnt and mastered several other difficult pieces on the way towards mastering those recalcitrant scores which had eluded me for decades. Success breeds success, as they say, and one by one, my preconceptions got shattered. Those 'impossibly difficult' pieces were playable - even performable - after all.

These days, whenever I feel like learning a new piece, I just put my mind to it without thinking that because it looks impossible, it is impossible. No more negative thoughts of this sort. If it's good enough to learn, it's worth the time to learn it properly, no matter how long it takes. grin


And for me, this is the key. After graduating, I took a break for more than a year because I was pretty burnt out and frustrated. I started a business that was not in the music field, and that replaced piano/school as the major source of stress in my life. As my business grew, I was lucky enough to work from home and then later in an office where I have a digital piano right next to my desk.
Every day, with absolutely zero pressure I would work on something just for the heck of it - it was a time that reminded me of when I was first preparing for auditions with no idea what I was supposed to be doing. I approached it with a sense of naivety on purpose, focusing on simplicity and lack of tension both emotionally and physically.

In the last few years doing this, my technique improved more practicing just a couple hours per day than it did during school when I practiced 4-6 hours per day. I am not a professional pianist and never will be, but I can say I have achieved my goal of being able to technically handle the vast majority of works in the standard rep.

At the end of the day, if you look at all the pianists who started young you will find a lot in common between them all:

Benefits of starting young:

1. lots of free, focused time to practice
2. children are naive and don't know how hard things are "supposed" to be
3. no bad habits to "unlearn"
4. often provided exposure to music and culture from an early age
5. If someone starts at age 5, by the time they are 18 they will have 13 years of practice

In my case, I think I simply got lucky that thanks to my circumstances a lot of those same factors carried over:

1. Working for myself for 13 years afforded me lots of free, focused time to practice
2. I had zero experience and had absolutely no clue how hard it was supposed to be
3. I had no bad habits to unlearn since I had no experience
4. I had a crash course in music when I got accepted to music school, and lived in a city where I could regularly attend concerts
5. I started at age 16, but by the time I am 29 - with the advantage of all the above benefits, I would up in roughly the same place that those who started at age 5 did - just at an older age.

So just now at age 29 I finally feel I am technically at where the best students in conservatory were. But the real beauty of it is that once you get to the point technically where you can play pretty much anything, well - you can pretty much play anything! And at age 29, I hopefully have a lot of years left in front of me enjoying that. Sure, I wish I had it ten years ago, but at least I have it now.

So subjectively speaking, and based 100% on my own experience, I would have to say that yes - our preconceptions hugely limit us in what we can achieve, but luck also plays a large part in giving us the circumstances to realize our potential.

All that I know for certain is that I am extremely grateful that I was stupid enough to not have any preconceptions when I first started playing. Because if I "knew" then what everyone else did, I would not be enjoying the music that I am today. Because it was supposed to be "impossible."
27 1,091 Read More
Digital Pianos - Synths & Keyboards
9 hours ago
Originally Posted by keykeyzkeys
Is there any valid point to get an analog synthesizer in today's digital world? They cost five times more. How are they still selling in a quite significant number? Is there any sound that they make that no digital synthesizers cannot make? Gurus smile Do enlighten us ;-)


First, analog synths don't have to be 5x more. Analog synths under $1000 include a bunch of stuff from Dave Smith (Mopho), Moog (Grandmother, Sub Phatty, Minitaur), Korg (ARP Odyssey, Volca, Minilogue, Monologue, MS20), Arturia (MiniBrute), Roland (JD-XI, SE-02), Berhinger (Model D, DeepMind), and more.

Some digitals get closer to analog sounds than others, much as some digital pianos get closer to the sound of a real piano, and some "clonewheels" get closer to the sound of a tonewheel Hammond and Leslie. Sometimes differences are more obvious, sometimes they're subtle, depending on exactly which ones you're talking about and what kind of patches you're trying to create, But things like sweeping filter resonances, pulse width modulation, oscillator sync, and portamento are areas where you are likely to notice sonic/behavioral differences, even if you get the basic timbre really close (or sample it). Digital synths that are specifically designed to emulate analog behavior (VA, virtual analog) will get closer than your typical rompler/workstation, but you'll still probably find differences. (And, for that matter, differences between different analog synths themselves.)
4 176 Read More
Pianist Corner
9 hours ago
It just shows that a great pianist can make any POS sound great. I was surprised that overall the piano sounded ok but the trebles were simply awful.
9 447 Read More
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4
New Topics - Multiple Forums
with my heart in my mouth.......
by Medved1. 06/19/18 08:49 PM
What Gives?
by keykeyzkeys. 06/19/18 08:28 PM
DX7?
by keykeyzkeys. 06/19/18 08:21 PM
Beethoven Pathétique Sonata 2nd movement
by dsw67. 06/19/18 07:24 PM
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